2013 Symposium

Please contact presentation authors directly to obtain copies of presentations. Author contact information is provided in the 2013 Book of Abstracts.

Agenda

Monday 21 Jan., 2013 AMSS Welcome

8:00am-12:00pm
Communicating Ocean Sciences Workshop

12pm - 1:30pm
Lunch on your own

Symposium opens
1:30 pm

1:30pm - 2:00pm

Opening Remarks &Welcome

Senator Mark Begich (DVD Presentation)

Senator Lisa Murkowski (DVD Presentation)

2:00pm - 2:40pm
Keynote: Jeremy Mathis

Preparing for the Challenges of Ocean Acidification In Alaska

2:40pm - 3:20pm
Keynote: Jessica Miller

Testing the Invasion Process: Survival, Dispersal, Genetic Characterization, and Attenuation of Marine Biota on the 2011 Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris Field

3:20pm-3:40pm

BREAK

3:40pm - 4:20pm
Keynote: Ed Farley

Chinook Salmon and the Marine Environment

4:20pm - 5:00pm
Keynote: Judith Connor

Technologies for Ocean Studies

POSTER RECEPTION: Arctic & Bering Sea/Aleutians Posters, Egan Center
5:45pm - 9:00pm

Tuesday 22 Jan., Arctic Plenary Schedule

1

8:00-8:30

ecosystem perspectives

A Half Century of Coastal Change Along the North Coast of Alaska

Bruce Richmond

 

2

8:30-8:45

ecosystem perspectives

An Integrated Ecosystem Field Study of Hanna Shoal, Northern Chukchi Sea, Alaska

Kenneth Dunton

 

3

8:45-9:00

ecosystem perspectives

An integrated ocean observing approach to understanding the effects of climate variability in the NE Chukchi Sea

Jeffrey Napp

 

4

9:00-9:15

human

Broader Impacts ON Scientists: Results from Alaska Marine Ecosystem Workshops and the National COSEE Scientist Survey

Robin Dublin

 

5

9:15-9:45

human

Thirty Years of Sociocultural Research on the North Slope of Alaska

Stephen Braund

 
 

9:45-10:15

COFFEE BREAK

 

6

10:15-10:30

climate & oceanography

Climate Impacts of the Loss of Summer Sea ice in the Beaufort Sea Since 2007

James Overland

 

7

10:30-10:45

climate & oceanography

A sea ice free summer Arctic within 30 years: An update from CMIP5 models

Muyin Wang

 

8

10:45-11:00

climate & oceanography

Modeling Ice and Circulation in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

Seth Danielson

 

9

11:00-11:15

climate & oceanography

The Chukchi-Beaufort Seas Mesoscale Meteorological Modeling Project: An Overview of High-Resolution Atmospheric Reanalysis (CBHAR)

Xiangdong Zhang

 

10

11:15-11:30

climate & oceanography

Leads and Landfast Ice in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas

Andrew Mahoney

 
 

11:30-1:00

LUNCH PROVIDED

11

1:00 -1:15

climate & oceanography

High-resolution observations of hydrography and circulation of the Chukchi Sea

Peter Winsor

 

12

1:15-1:30

LTL

Using imaging flow cytometry to examine phytoplankton assemblage structure in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

Samuel Laney

 

13

1:30-1:45

LTL

Zooplankton of the Chukchi and northern Bering Sea in Early Winter – Results from the 2011 November-December Cruise on USCGC Healy

Carin Ashjian

 

14

1:45-2:00

LTL

Indigenous Arctic Microorganisms Degrade Oil in Arctic Seawater

Kelly McFarlin

PhD

15

2:00-2:15

Fish & Invertes

The Arctic Ecosystem Integrated Survey (Arctic Eis)

Franz Mueter

 

16

2:15-2:30

Fish & Invertes

Dispersal of adult Dolly Varden from the Wulik River, Alaska, evaluated using satellite telemetry

Andrew Seitz

 
 

2:30-3:00

COFFEE BREAK

17

3:00-3:15

seabirds

Post-breeding shorebird use of food resources at river deltas along the Beaufort Sea Coast

Roy Churchwell

PhD

18

3:15-3:30

seabirds

Complex Foodweb Dynamics of the Marine Bird Communities of the High and Low Arctic

Douglas Causey

 

19

3:30-3:45

mammals

Sixty years of bowhead whale stable isotope geochemistry and linkages to the rapidly changing Arctic

Nadine Lysiak

 

20

3:45-4:00

mammals

Bowhead Whale Feeding Ecology Study (BOWFEST) - Five years in review

David Rugh

 

21

4:00-4:15

mammals

An index of optimum sustainable population for the Pacific Walrus

James MacCracken

 

22

4:15-4:30

mammals

Acoustic detection of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas 2008 – 2011 

Kalyn MacIntyre

MS

23

4:30-4:45

mammals

Spatial Use Patterns of Ribbon and Spotted Seals in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

Josh London

 

24

4:45-5:00

mammals

Variation in the nutritional and reproductive ecology of two polar bear populations experiencing sea ice loss

Karyn Rode

 
 

5:45 -9:00

  POSTER RECEPTION: Bering Sea/Aleutians & Gulf of Alaska Posters, Egan Center    

Wednesday 23 Jan., Bering Sea/Aleutians Plenary Schedule

1

8:00-8:30

Ecosystem perspectives

What controls trophic interconnectivity in the eastern Bering Sea?

Michael Lomas

 

2

8:30-8:45

Ecosystem perspectives

Declines of top predators in the central Bering Sea: Are Pribilof seabirds and fur seals living in the wrong neighborhood?

Andrew Trites

 

3

8:45-9:00

Ecosystem perspectives

Identifying Important Ecological Areas in the Aleutian Islands

Jon Warrenchuk

 

4

9:00-9:15

Ecosystem perspectives

Distribution of corals and sponges in two large canyons on the Bering Sea shelf break

John Hocevar

 

5

9:15-9:30

Humans

Targeting ability under rights-based management: The Amendment 80 Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands groundfish fishery

Matthew Reimer

 
 

9:30-10:00

COFFEE BREAK

 

6

10:00-10:15

Humans

Permit Stacking in Bristol Bay

Marcus Gho

 

7

10:15-10:30

Humans

Using traditional knowledge interviews and participatory mapping to identify drivers of habitat change and fine-scale habitat features for ice seals and walruses 

Lily Ray

 

8

10:30-10:45

Humans

Lewis Point, a seasonal subsistence fish camp in transition: negotiations in a mixed cash/subsistence economy 1980-2011

Jory Stariwat

MS

9

10:45-11:00

climate & oceanography

Ice-Ocean Interactions in the Bering Sea: Observations and Model Simulations

Margaret Sullivan

 

10

11:00-11:15

climate & oceanography

GEOSTROPHIC CIRCULATION AND WATER MASSES OF THE SE BERING SEA SHELF

Edward Cokelet

 

11

11:15-11:30

climate & oceanography

INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF THE CARBON BUDGET IN THE SOUTHEASTERN BERING SEA: FROM THE ATMOSPHERE TO THE SEDIMENT

Jessica Cross

PhD

 

11:30-13:00

Lunch ON YOUR OWN

 

12

1:00 -1:15

lower trophic level

Spring and fall phytoplankton blooms in a productive subarctic ecosystem, the eastern Bering Sea, during 1995-2011

Mike Sigler

 

13

1:15-1:30

lower trophic level

On-shelf transport of oceanic mesozooplankton populations in the Eastern Bering Sea

G. Gibsonp>

 

14

1:30-1:45

lower trophic level

Climate-mediated changes in zooplankton community structure for the eastern Bering Sea

Lisa Eisner

 

15

1:45-2:00

Fish and Fish Habitat

The influence of a changing climate in management: a Management Strategy Evaluation for the fishery for snow crab in the eastern Bering Sea.

Cody Szuwalski

PhD

16

2:00-2:15

Fish and Fish Habitat

Evolving perceptions of forage fish distributions in the SE Bering Sea

Sandra Parker-Stetter

 

17

2:15-2:30

Fish and Fish Habitat

Ecology of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) in canyon and slope habitats of the eastern Bering Sea

Janet Duffy-Anderson

 
 

2:30-3:00

COFFEE BREAK

 

18

3:00-3:15

Fish and Fish Habitat

The influence of climate change and predation on biological reference points estimated from multispecies and single species stock assessment models.

Kirstin Holsman

 

19

3:15-3:30

seabirds

Hydrographic structure and the distribution of seabird communities across the southeastern Bering Sea Shelf

George Hunt

 

20

3:30-3:45

seabirds

Do Albatrosses Use Molting Areas in the Aleutian Islands? Important Bird Areas within Productive Fishing Grounds

Robert Suryan

 

21

3:45-4:00

seabirds

Year-round spatial and temporal distribution of a small, diving seabird, the Crested Auklet (Aethia cristatella), originating from a breeding site at Buldir Island, Aleutian Islands.

Jill Robinson

MS

22

4:00-4:15

Mammals

Some maternal Steller sea lion diets elevate fetal mercury concentrations in the western Aleutian Island area of decline.

Lorrie Rea

 

23

4:15-4:30

Mammals

Winter site fidelity of bearded seals in the Bering Sea

Peter Boveng

 

24

4:30-4:45

Mammals

Soviet catches of whales in the North Pacific: revised totals

Yulia Ivashchenko

PhD

25

4:45 - 5:00

Mammals

Killer whale (Orcinus orca) depredation effects on catch rates of six groundfish species: Implications for commercial longline fisheries in Alaska

Megan Peterson

PhD

 

5:00 -5:15

Best Student Poster Presentation Winners Announced

    WORKSHOPS

 

Keynotes

Monday, January 21

2:10 - 2:50 pm
Keynote: Jeremy Mathis, NOAA – Pacific Marine Environmental Lab

Preparing for the Challenges of Ocean Acidification In Alaska

New data from ship-based and moored observations, species manipulation experiments and model outputs continue to show that ocean acidification is an imminent and potentially disruptive threat for the coastal waters of Alaska. Precipitous reductions in pH as well as the suppression of important carbonate mineral concentrations are being observed from the waterways of southeastern Alaska to the rapidly changing coastline of the Beaufort Sea. In the last two and a half centuries, but mainly in the past fifty years, the pH of the ocean has been reduced due to the intrusion of anthropogenic CO2 produced mainly from fossil fuel burning and changes in land use practices. This reduction in pH could have far-reaching and detrimental consequences for a number of marine species, particularly those that produce carbonate shells. With a multi-billion dollar fishing industry and a large subsistence population that relies heavily on ocean resources for the majority of their dietary protein, Alaska is particularly vulnerable to the impacts of ocean acidification. Here, newly synthesized economic data that provides the first assessment of the potential financial consequences of ocean acidification will be presented along with strategies for combating and adapting to changes brought on by a reduction in pH.  These new strategies include the construction of a multi-million dollar network of moorings that will be capable of providing early warning data to stakeholders and policymakers throughout Alaska and the rest of the country. This project provides an ideal framework for future efforts because it harnesses resources from the state government, federal and private funding agencies and non-governmental organizations. Ocean acidification is a complex problem that will require a multilateral approach to solve, but with a concerted, well-coordinated effort we can sustain Alaska’s fisheries.

2:50 - 3:30 pm
Keynote: Jessica Miller, Oregon State University, Department of Fisheries & Wildlife

Testing the Invasion Process: Survival, Dispersal, Genetic Characterization, and Attenuation of Marine Biota on the 2011 Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris Field

The tsunami that was generated as a result of a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan on 11 March 2011 resulted in devastating loss of human life and extensive damage to infrastructure. This natural disaster interacted with a seascape of infrastructure in a highly urbanized and industrialized setting. This potentially unique interaction delivered a field of debris that contains an unknown number of docks, vessels, buoys and aquaculture facilities potentially covered by animal and plant communities to the Pacific Ocean. A striking example of this debris field is the large floating dock from Misawa, Japan that arrived on a beach in central Oregon in early June 2012 with a diverse community of marine life (>100 species overall). The community included species commonly observed on oceanic floating debris, such as pelagic barnacles (Lepas sp.) but there were also other intertidal and subtidal species not currently present in Oregon. At least 12 species known to be invasive in other regions of the world have been identified, including the European blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), the Asian brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida), the Asian shore crab (Hemigrapsus sanguineus), the Japanese seastar (Asterias amurensis), the Asian pink barnacle (Megabalanus rosa), and a small tubeworm, (Hydroides ezoensis). We also collected many other species of mollusks, small crustaceans, worms, and an urchin. To our knowledge, no such rafted community of coastal organisms has been previously documented surviving an ocean voyage of >10,000 kilometers, nor has rafting of Asian species from the Western to the Eastern Pacific Ocean been previously observed. It is very difficult to predict the magnitude or the impact of biota arriving with the tsunami debris but a narrow opportunity exists to test critical questions in invasion theory and ecology by quantitatively, chemically and genetically documenting biota associated with the debris to evaluate both transoceanic dispersal and the potential impact of non-native Asian species. The current phenomenon provides an opportunity to advance our understanding of invasion biology by documenting key parameters, such as propagule pressure and species traits, with empirical data that we will use to quantify spatial and temporal variation in species diversity, condition and attrition.

3:30 - 4:10 pm
Keynote: Edward Farley, NOAA/NMFS/Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Auke Bay Laboratori

Chinook Salmon and the Marine Environment

Chinook salmon are an important cultural, commercial, and sport salmon species to the people of Alaska. Recent sharp declines in Chinook salmon returns to Alaska’s rivers have lead to disaster declarations by the State of Alaska and Federal Government for some communities. The question is: “where have all the salmon gone?” Chinook salmon are anadromous, meaning their life cycle is dependent on environmental conditions in both freshwater and marine environments. Understanding the potential impacts of climate change on Chinook is complicated by the wide disparity between the effects of climate change on freshwater habitats, where long term temperatures are sharply increasing, and on the marine environment where warming occurs only very slowly, if at all. Mortality can be high and variable in both of these environments, but scientists believe the recent synchronous decline in Alaska’s Chinook salmon returns is largely due to factors impacting their survival in the marine environment. We provide data on climate, distribution, migration, and diet of Chinook salmon in order to describe their marine ecology and understand effects of climate on the timing of the life cycle (phenology). The following hypotheses explaining the decline in Alaska’s Chinook populations will also be discussed: 1) match – mismatch hypothesis: early marine mortality operating for all Alaskan Chinook salmon is the mismatch between timing of the life cycle in freshwater and the annual cycle of productivity in the marine environment, which is caused by the differential effects of climate change in the continental spawning and rearing areas and the nearshore marine environment; 2) critical size and period hypothesis: where climate change is effecting growth and energetic status during the first year at sea impacting marine survival over winter;  3) reduced size at age hypothesis: harvest on larger Chinook salmon has reduced fecundity in adult spawning populations leading to lower productivity.

4:10 - 4:50 pm
Keynote: Judith Connor, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Technologies for Ocean Studies

When David Packard founded the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) 25 years ago, he challenged us to develop new methods and systems to address important ocean science questions, with a goal of sharing the results with the broader science community and the public. MBARI’s approach is built on teamwork of researchers and engineers and takes advantage of our ready access to the sea. Early engineering efforts focused on developing tools and techniques for the use of remotely operated vehicles for ocean exploration. The resulting high-resolution video images and data are managed as an archive of biological, chemical, geological, and physical information for research and education. The software system, the Video Annotation and Reference System developed for annotation and access to those data, is available as open-source software.

Collaborative research projects with external groups broaden the use of other MBARI technologies−from a deep-sea observatory deployed in the Sargasso Sea to the high-resolution multibeam system in an autonomous underwater vehicle mapping the Canadian Arctic seafloor. Formal business partners have commercialized instrumentation such as the In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer and the Environmental Sample Processor to help get technological innovations into other research labs. We further extend our reach with intern and postdoctoral programs, and with images, lesson plans, data, and other information available on the internet to enhance interest and understanding in the ocean. These efforts have the potential to improve research access to new technology and to inspire public understanding of the ocean processes that give life to our planet. 

Sponsors

Alaska Bering Sea Crabbers
Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Alaska Ocean Observing System
Alaska Pacific University
Alaska Sea Grant
Alaska SeaLife Center
Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands LCC
Arctic LCC
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE-Alaska)
Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council
Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustees
International Pacific Halibut Commission
Kachemak Bay Research Reserve
National Park Service
Navy Region Northwest
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA AK Regional Collaboration Team)
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Fisheries - AFSC)
North Pacific Fishery Management Council
North Pacific Research Board
North Slope Borough
North Slope Science Initiative
Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators - Alaska
Oil Spill Recovery Institute (OSRI)
Pollock Conservation Cooperative Research Center
Prince William Sound Science Center
School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks
United States Arctic Research Commission
United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS-Alaska Region)
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
Western Alaska LCC

Exhibitors

Alaska Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence

Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game

Alaska Ocean Observing System

Alaska Regional Collaboration Team

Alaska SeaLife Center

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Cook Inlet RCAC

Entiat River Tech.

Kachemak Bay Research Reserve

Lotek Wireless Inc. / Sirtrack Ltd.

NOAA - Response and Restoration

North Pacific Research Board

North Slope Borough

Oil Spill Recovery Institute/Prince William Sound Science Center

Prince William Sound RCAC

U.S. Arctic Research Commission

USGS - AK Science Center and Alaska Regional office

Podcasts

Margaret Sullivan

 

Time Speaker Presentation Title Podcast
MONDAY                January 21
     
2:00-2:40 Jeremy Mathis Preparing for the Challenges of Ocean Acidification in Alaska Jeremy Mathis
2:40-3:20 Jessica Miller Testing the Invasion Process: Survival, Dispersal, Genetic Characterization, and Attenuation of Marine BIota on the 2011 Japananese Tsunami Marine Debri Field Jessica Miller
3:40-4:20 Edward Farley Chinook Salmon and the Marine Environment Ed Farley
4:20-5:00 Judith Connor Technologies for Ocean Studies Judith Connor
TUESDAY               January 22
     
8:00-8:30 Bruce Richmond A Half Century of Coastal Change Along the North Coast of Alaska Bruce Richmond
8:30-8:45 Kenneth Dunton An Integrated Ecosystem Field Study of Hanna Shoal,
Northern Chukchi Sea, Alaska
Kenneth Dunton
8:45-9:00 Jeffrey Napp An Integrated Ocean Observing Approach to Understanding the
Effects of Climate Variability in the NE Chukchi Sea
Jeffrey Napp
9:00-9:15 Robin Dublin Broader Impacts on Scientists: Results from Alaska Marine
Ecosystem Workshops and the National CO SEE Scientist Survey
Robin Dublin
9:15-9:45 Steven Braund Thirty Years of Sociocultural Research on the North Slope of
Alaska
Stephen Braund
10:15-10:30 James Overland Climate Impacts of the Loss of Summer Sea ice in the
Beaufort Sea Since 2007
James Overland
10:30-10:45 Muyin Wang A Sea Ice Free Summer Arctic Within 30 years: An Update from
CMIP5 Models
Muyin Wang
10:45-11:00 Seth Danielson Modeling Ice and Circulation in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas Seth Danielson
11:00-11:15 Xiangdong Zhang The Chukchi-Beaufort Seas Mesoscale Meteorological
Modeling Project: An Overview of High-Resolution Atmospheric Reanalysis
(CBHAR)
Xiangdong Zhang
11:15-11:30 Andrew Mahoney Leads and Landfast Ice in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas Andrew Mahoney
1:00-1:15 Peter Winsor High-Resolution Observations of Hydrography and Circulation of
the Chukchi Sea
Peter Winsor
1:15-1:30 Samuel Laney Using Imaging Flow Cytometry to Examine Phytoplankton
Assemblage Structure in the Bering and Chukchi Seas
Samuel Laney
1:30-1:45 Carin Ashjian Zooplankton of the Chukchi and Northern Bering Sea in Early
Winter – Results from the 2011 November-December Cruise on USCGC Healy
Carin Ashjian
1:45-2:00 *Kelly McFarlin Indigenous Arctic Microorganisms Degrade Oil in Arctic
Seawater
Kelly McFarlin
2:00-2:15 Franz Mueter The Arctic Ecosystem Integrated Survey (Arctic EIS) Franz Mueter
2:15-2:30 Andrew Seitz Dispersal of Adult Dolly Varden from the Wulik River, Alaska,
Evaluated Using Satellite Telemetry
Andrew Seitz
3:00-3:15 *Roy Churchwell Post-Breeding Shorebird Use of Food Resources at River
Deltas Along the Beaufort Sea Coast
Roy Churchwell
3:15-3:30 Douglas Causey Complex Foodweb Dynamics of the Marine Bird Communities
of the High and Low Arctic
Douglas Causey
3:30-3:45 Nadine Lysiak Sixty Years of Bowhead Whale Stable Isotope Geochemistry and
Linkages to the Rapidly Changing Arctic
Nadine Lysiak
3:45-4:00 David Rugh Bowhead Whale Feeding Ecology Study (BOWFEST) – Five Years
in Review
David Rugh
4:00-4:15 James MacCraken An Index of Optimum Sustainable Population for the
Pacific Walrus
James MacCracken
4:15-4:30 *Kalyn MacIntyre Acoustic Detection of Bearded Seals (Erignathus barbatus)
in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas 2008 – 2011
Kalyn MacIntyre
4:30-4:45 Josh London Spatial Use Patterns of Ribbon and Spotted Seals in the Bering
and Chukchi Seas
Josh London
4:45-5:00 Karyn Rode Variation in the Nutritional and Reproductive Ecology of Two Polar
Bear Populations Experiencing Sea Ice Loss
Karyn Rode
WEDNESDAY          January 23
     
8:00-8:30 Michael Lomas What controls trophic interconnectivity in the eastern Bering Sea? Michael Lomas
8:30-8:45 Andrew Trites Declines of top predators in the central Bering Sea: Are Pribilof seabirds and fur seals living in the wrong neighborhood? Andrew Trites
8:45-9:00 Jon Warrenchuk Identifying Important Ecological Areas in the Aleutian Islands Jon Warrenchuk
9:00-9:15 John Hocevar Distribution of corals and sponges in two large canyons on the Bering Sea shelf break John Hocevar
9:15-9:30 Matthew Reimer Targeting ability under rights-based management: The Amendment 80 Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands groundfish fishery Matthew Reimer
10:00-10:15 Marcus Gho Permit Stacking in Bristol Bay Marcus Gho
10:15-10:30 Lily Ray Using traditional knowledge interviews and participatory mapping to identify drivers of habitat change and fine-scale habitat features for ice seals and walruses Lily Ray
10:30-10:45 Jory Stariwat Lewis Point, a seasonal subsistence fish camp in transition: negotiations in a mixed cash/subsistence economy 1980-2011 Jory Stariwat
10:45-11:00 Margaret Sullivan Ice-Ocean Interactions in the Bering Sea: Observations and Model Simulations
11:00-11:15 Edward Cokele Geostrophic Circulation and Water Masses of the SE Bering Sea Shelf Edward Cokelet
11:15-11:30 Jessica Cross Integrated Assessment of the Carbon Budget in the Southeastern Bering Sea: from the Atmosphere to the Sediment Jessica Cross
1:00-1:15 Mike Sigler Spring and fall phytoplankton blooms in a productive subarctic ecosystem, the eastern Bering Sea, during 1995-2011 Mike Sigler
1:15-1:30 G. Gibson On-shelf transport of oceanic mesozooplankton populations in the Eastern Bering Sea G. Gibson
1:30-1:45 Lisa Eisner Climate-mediated changes in zooplankton community structure for the eastern Bering Sea Lisa Eisner
1:45-2:00 Cody Szuwalski The influence of a changing climate in management: a Management Strategy Evaluation for the fishery for snow crab in the eastern Bering Sea. Cody Szuwalski
2:00-2:15 Sandra Parker-Stetter Evolving perceptions of forage fish distributions in the SE Bering Sea Sandra Parker-Stetter
2:15-2:30 Janet Duffy-Anderson Ecology of Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) in canyon and slope habitats of the eastern Bering Sea Janet Duffy-Anderson
3:00-3:15 Kirstin Holsman The influence of climate change and predation on biological reference points estimated from multispecies and single species stock assessment models. Kirstin Holsman
3:15-3:30 George Hunt Hydrographic structure and the distribution of seabird communities across the southeastern Bering Sea Shelf George Hunt
3:30-3:45 Robert Suryan Do Albatrosses Use Molting Areas in the Aleutian Islands? Important Bird Areas within Productive Fishing Grounds Robert Suryan
3:45-4:00 Jill Robinson Year-round spatial and temporal distribution of a small, diving seabird, the Crested Auklet (Aethia cristatella), originating from a breeding site at Buldir Island, Aleutian Islands. N/A
4:00-4:15 Lorrie Rea Some maternal Steller sea lion diets elevate fetal mercury concentrations in the western Aleutian Island area of decline. Lorrie Rea
4:15-4:30 Peter Boveng Winter site fidelity of bearded seals in the Bering Sea Peter Boveng
4:30-4:45 Yulia Ivashchenko Soviet catches of whales in the North Pacific: revised totals Yulia Ivashchenko
4:45-5:00 Megan Peterson Killer whale (Orcinus orca) depredation effects on catch rates of six groundfish species: Implications for commercial longline fisheries in Alaska Megan Peterson
THURSDAY            January 24
     
8:00-8:30 Olav Ormseth The Gulf of Alaska in 2011: the view from GOAIERP Olav Ormseth
8:30-8:45 Kevin Thompson The effects of temperature and predator densities on the consumption of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) in three groundfish predators in the Gulf of Alaska Kevin Thompson
8:45-9:00 Gunnar Knapp Empirical measures for Alaskan fishing communitie Gunnar Knapp
9:00-9:15 Jason Good Sensemaking at sea: Organizing for self-management at the front line of Alaska’s commercial fisheries Jason Good
9:15-9:30 Lisa Busch Between Pacific Tides: Engaging the Community of Sitka in Science through Time Lisa Busch
10:15-10:30 Phyllis Stabeno Along-shelf and cross-shelf flow in the Gulf of Alaska with some implications for primary production Phyllis Stabeno
10:30-10:45 David Musgrave Seasonal surface circulation, temperature, and salinity in Prince William Sound, Alaska David Musgrave
10:45-11:00 Russell Hopcroft Measuring the pulse of the Gulf of Alaska: oceanographic observations along Seward Line, and in Prince William Sound 1997-2012 Russell Hopcroft
11:00-11:15 Ayla Doubleday Seasonal and inter-annual patterns of pteropod and larvacean estimates in the coastal Gulf of Alaska Ayla Doubleday
11:15-11:30 Sonia Batten Fifty Shades of Green – phytoplankton time series from the Continuous Plankton Recorder survey. Sonia Batten
1:00-1:15 Suzanne Strom Phytoplankton communities and processes in the coastal Gulf of Alaska: implications of an anomalous year Suzanne Strom
1:15-1:30 Raphaelle Descoteaux Effects of ocean acidification on development of Alaskan crab larvae Raphaelle Descoteaux
1:30-1:45 Christopher Siddon Getting to the bottom of it: a critical look at stock assessment estimates for Red King Crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) in southeastern Alaska Christopher Siddon
1:45-2:00 Craig Faunce A field test of an observer-audit approach to improve catch reporting in Alaska: NPRB Project 1017 Alternative catch monitoring of Alaskan groundfish Craig Faunce
2:00-2:15 Thomas Farrugia Movement Patterns of Skates in the Gulf of Alaska and Implications for the Management of a Skate Fishery Thomas Farrugia
2:15-2:30 Cindy Tribuzio The spiny issue of ageing spiny dogfish: historical dogma vs. new methods Cindy Tribuzio
3:00-3:15 W. Pegau Prince William Sound Herring Survey Program W. Pegau
3:15-3:30 Daniel Cushing Changes in mid-summer abundance of Brachyramphus murrelets in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1989-2012. Daniel Cushing
3:30-3:45 Jan Straley Baleen Whales and Tubenose Seabirds—A Chemosensory Comparison? Jan Straley
3:45-4:00 Briana Witteveen Using acoustic assessment of pelagic backscatter to assess prey use and niche separation of fin and humpback whales near Kodiak Island, Alaska Briana Witteveen
4:00-4:15 Benjamin Weitzman Colonization in Action: Understanding the impacts of sea otters on soft-sediment invertebrate communities Benjamin Weitzman
4:15-4:30 Sarah Fortune Overlooked and underappreciated: the role of squids in the diet of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in southeast Alaska Sarah Fortune
4:30-4:45 Gregory Walker Augmenting Steller Sea Lion Surveys in The Western Aleutians with Unmanned Aircraft Gregory Walker

 

Posters

 

Matthew Baker, Bering Sea, Fish and Fish Habitat

 

AMSS_2013_M.Baker

 

Jennifer Cahalan, Gulf of Alaska, Fish and Fish Habitat

 

AMSS_2013_J.Cahalan

 

Douglas Causey, Arctic, Seabirds

 

AMSS_2013_D.Causey

 

Craig Faunce, Gulf of Alaska, Fish and Fish Habitat

 

AMSS_2013_C.Faunce

 

Lisa Guy, Arctic, Ecosystem Perspectives

 

AMSS_2013_L.Sheffield_Guy

 

Chip Johnson, Gulf of Alaska, Mammals

 

AMSS _2013_C.Johnson

 

Craig Kastelle, Bering Sea, Fish and FIsh Habitat

 

AMSS_2013_C.Kastelle

 

Stephen Meck, Gulf of Alaska, Mammals

 

AMSS_2013_S.Meck

 

Stephanie Norman, Gulf of Alaska, Ecosystem Perspectives

 

AMSS_2013_S.Norman

 

Amelia O'Connor, Bering Sea, Seabirds

 

AMSS_2013_A.OConnor

 

Jan Straley, Gulf of Alaska, Marine Mammals

 

AMSS_2013_J. Straley

 

Alexis Will, Gulf of Alaska, Seabirds

 

AMSS_2013_A.Will

 

Workshops

 

Sunday, January 20

 

PacMARS-SOAR Open Workshop

 

(8am-5pm) - HCC AFT DECK

 

The Pacific Marine Arctic Regional Synthesis (PacMARS) is a project underwritten by the North Pacific Marine Research Institute to assemble by mid-year 2013 up-to-date written documentation that contributes to understanding the Pacific-influenced continental shelf ecosystem of the Arctic Ocean. The objective is to compile the best available knowledge from local communities, peer-reviewed social and natural sciences, as well as less readily available knowledge sources. The overall goal is to provide guidance for scientific research needs in the region. The Synthesis of Arctic Research (SOAR) is a 5-year project supported by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). SOAR is chartered to synthesize scientific information and local observations to improve understanding of the relationships among oceanographic conditions, benthic organisms, lower trophic prey species (forage fish and zooplankton), seabirds, and marine mammal distribution and behavior for the Pacific Arctic region.  The SOAR effort builds on existing interdisciplinary work to develop detailed syntheses to inform management decision-makers and to guide future research studies.

 

Based on the synergistic objectives of PacMARS and SOAR, we are jointly sponsoring an open community workshop on 20 January 2013, just prior to the 2013 Alaska Marine Science Symposium in Anchorage, Alaska, to provide an update of our activities and to solicit input on  themes for future research initiatives in the region. The agenda for the PacMARS-SOAR workshop will include highlight presentations of activities from both synthesis projects, followed by break-out sessions with the workshop participants to identify additional data synthesis activities being undertaken, and to develop a composite of scientific themes for future interdisciplinary and interagency efforts in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas.

 

Further information on the workshop will be available on the PacMARS (http://pacmars.cbl.umces.eduand SOAR (http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/soar/) websites.  

 

Contact PacMARS lead Jackie Grebmeier (jgrebmei@umces.edu) and/or SOAR lead Sue Moore (sue.moore@noaa.gov) with any questions.

 

Planning to attend? RSVP Lisa Guy

 

(https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?fromEmail=true&formkey=

 

dDhVV0M3cTNJQnJ4ZDMxOE9YVnRTckE6MQ) with your name and contact information.

 

COSEE-Alaska, North Pacific Research Board, Alaska Ocean Observing System, UAA CWLA Program, and 49 Writers introduce: Writing Science Creatively: what inquiring minds want to know (2-4pm) - ENDEAVOR

 

How can you begin, or continue, writing creatively about science? How do you translate scientific facts and journal articles into engaging and even poetic language and your “scientific voice” into a more personal one? Join this panel discussion by writers whose science writing spans the spectrum from outreach for science institutions and interpretation of natural resources on public lands to creative non-fiction, novels, and poetry.  You will receive practical writing advice, a reading list, ideas for places to publish, and an opportunity to participate in a new Alaska science writing blog.

 

Panel Members: Sherry Simpson, Nancy Lord, and Andromeda Romano-Lax, faculty members, the UAA Creative Writing and Literary Arts Program (CWLA); and Judith Connor, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.

 

Monday, January 21

 

Communicating Ocean Sciences

 

(8am-11:45am) - HCC DISCOVERY BALLROOM (12:15-1:15 No-host lunch @ NPRB Conference Room)

 

Coffee and tea will be available.

 

Schedule

 

8:00-8:15       Introductions

 

8:15-9:15       Keynotes (4 presentations, 15 minutes each)

 

9:15-10:15      Breakout Sessions led by keynote presenters (2 sessions, 25 minutes long: attendees can participate in 2 of the 4 sessions)

 

10:15-10:30    Break

 

10:30-11:45    Report out and Open Mic:3 minutes per person

 

12:15-1:15      No-host lunch for Northwest Aquatic and Marine Education (NAME)
members and anyone else interested in marine or aquatic education at NPRB Conference Room (1007 W 3rd. Ave, Suite 100)

 

Keynote Topics/Speakers:

 

  • Jennifer Magnusson, Marine Educator: Shipboard outreach and use of web-based communication
  • Judith Connor, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute: Communicating about ocean acidification and climate change and use of video
  • Nancy Lord, Author: Artists in research settings and the use of writing
  • Lisa Busch, Sitka Sound Science Center: Scientist-community connections and the use of radio

 

Workshop Details:

 

Following the keynote presentations, the keynote speakers will lead facilitated breakout groups for further discussion on their strategies and methods of communication. The breakout groups report out to the entire group and then an “Open Mic” period will provide an opportunity for audience members to share their current ocean science communication projects and programs (3 minute maximum/speaker).

 

Highlights of the 2013 Workshop include:

 

  • 2013 COS-W Tip Sheets: Workshop organizers and keynote speakers will provide “tip sheets” for the outreach and education tool they present and discuss in the breakout groups, including useful links and contacts.
  • 2013 COS-W Success Stories: Every year workshop participants have great examples that would benefit other participants. Please use the format below to submit your Success Story and bring 75-100 copies to the workshop. We also encourage you to bring 75-100 copies of brochures and other publications.
  • 2013 COS-W Open Mic: We are providing an Open Microphone for brief presentations (3 minutes maximum) on one of your current ocean communication efforts or programs.
  • 2013 COS-W Contacts Share: Each year, our workshop is filled with amazing scientists and communicators. We will provide a list to each participant so that you can network with others following the workshop.
  • Last but not Least . . . Prizes! Everyone who attends the workshop is eligible for door prizes provided by our keynote speakers. If you share your Success Story or speak during the Open Mic period, you will get a second or third chance in the drawing for the door prizes. Everyone who completes an on-line evaluation following the workshop will also have a chance at prizes!

 

Register for the 2013 Communicating Ocean Science Workshop @ AMSS

 

Register here by 12pm on Thursday Jan 17th, 2013. Registration is free

 

Submit your Success Story!

 

Please submit one example of a successful marine outreach and education activity or experience using the template below so we can make them available online following the workshop.  Also, please bring 75-100 copies to share with workshop participants.

 

(TEMPLATE)

 

Please keep your entire submission to one page and send to Marilyn Sigman msigman@alaska.edu

 

Tuesday, January 22

 

Career Tracks at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game

 

(12:00-2pm drop-in) - HCC VOYAGER

 

Calling all students and interested professionals! This is an informal information session, and participants can come and go as they please. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) will be on site recruiting for current and future openings, and a department recruiter will be providing information about the department’s numerous divisions and current opportunities and answering questions about department careers and internships. ADF&G is a state government agency that is constitutionally mandated to protect, maintain, and improve the fish, game, and aquatic plant resources of Alaska through the sustained yield principle. ADF&G manages approximately 750 active fisheries, 26 game management units, and 32 special areas. Plus, the department has about 1,700 employees and an annual operating budget of almost $200 million, so there are many opportunities to become part of our team. Session attendees can learn more about ADF&G, pick up an Opportunities Guide, and also sign up for e-mail notifications for new employment opportunities. Alaska is an amazing place to discover a career, and our careers are unlike any other. Come discover Your Career in the Last FrontierTM!

 

Contact: Candice Bressler, ADFG candice.bressler@alaska.gov

 

Arctic Observing Town Hall

 

(5:15-6:30pm, immediately following the plenary session) - HCC QUARTER DECK

 

Town Hall style meeting to present the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS) draft conceptual plan for a “core” Alaska Arctic Observing System. This would be a barebones system that could be enhanced with other agency and industry funded efforts to provide a robust monitoring system to meet a host of stakeholder needs, from the navigation community to ecosystem and climate change researchers to subsistence communities. The plan incorporates existing data collection efforts and identifies information gaps. The meeting will also provide an overview of the NOAA-industry data sharing agreements and data soon to be made publicly available on the AOOS website.

 

Contact: Molly McCammon AOOS mccammon@aoos.org

 

Wednesday, January 23

 

Acoustic Modeling and Measurements for Marine Mammal Mitigation: Challenges and Potential Innovations

 

(11:30am-1pm) - HCC ADVENTURE

 

Workshop description: Prior to starting seismic acquisition programs in Alaska, industry is usually required to undertake modeling to predict the extent of the 190, 180, 160, and 120 dB RE 1 µPA isopleths, each of which has implications for mitigation of potential marine mammal impacts. In addition, industry is usually required to undertake field measurements as soon as airgun use is initiated to confirm or revise model predictions. Over the past decade, numerous models have been evaluated against field measurements, but the degree to which models and field measurements typically agree has not been systematically assessed. Given uncertainties in model inputs and site-specific field conditions during collection of field measurements, the degree to which model predictions should match measurements is not at all clear. Also, which of the two approaches—modeling or measurements--provides values most suited for mitigation is not clear. This workshop will discuss methods currently used as well as innovative methods to model and measure acoustic footprints, possibly identifying steps to improve future efforts.

 

Co-organizers: Bill Streever ("Streever, Bill J" Bill.Streever@bp.com), Lisanne Aerts (Lisanne Aerts lisanne@LAMAECOLOGICAL.COM), and Caryn Rea ("Rea, Caryn (ConocoPhillips)" Caryn.Rea@conocophillips.com)

 

RSVP "Iles, Keri (SWIFT)" Keri.Iles@bp.com (Box lunches provided)

 

A vision for stewardship in the Arctic: Integrating the twin goals of enhancing ecological resilience and human well-being (11:30am-1:00pm) - HCC ENDEAVOR

 

As global interest in the circumpolar Arctic grows, so does the need for science to contribute to shaping a new era of stewardship in the Arctic.  In this workshop, Margaret Williams will chair a discussion on the application of science to management and conservation in a rapidly changing Arctic.  Ms. Williams will solicit ins